Forgiven

Harriet in full camouflage

It has been an honor to rehabilitate and care for brave Harriet, pictured here in her camouflage blankie.  She has more humanity than that pig-man who now rots in jail for what he did to her and seven other dogs.  I know Harriet has more forgiveness built into her than I do for that monster because DOG is GOD spelled backwards.

Happy endings is what fostering and adoption are all about.

I’m comforted knowing that Harriet’s cruising years of 5-9 will be rewarding, stress free, and fun for her.  She will never be hungry or cold again.  I smile when I imagine her golden years, with a powder grey face that probably scores lots of table scraps.  Blessed are those who step up to the plate to save a life, knowing that dogs of every age have value.  Rescue dogs, many of which have known love and are owner surrenders (moving, divorce, job changes, or sometimes illness or death of owner) and, sadly, some who have been cruelly neglected or abused know…they somehow know….they are special.  They fit in right away and adapt in ways that can not be explained. Intuitively, they are grateful and especially loyal.

 I was a dog snob; I admit it. 

For the past 35 years, my husband and I have only purchased German Shorthaired Pointer puppies with champion bloodlines from reputable breeders.  There is a need for proper breeding and breeders, no doubt.   My husband is a Patron Member of Pheasants Forever and seriously trains and hunts our dogs out west.  There was a time when we would have never considered a dog like Harriet, who came to us as an adult:  naked, broken and abused without papers.  She did not have a collar, a toy, or one worldly possession.  Only she knows the ugly truth that she endured for five years, tied to a pole in a freezing Indiana barn.

This amazing dog has opened my eyes.  She has tons of heart, hustle, and natural ability that isn’t published on a paper, making her her what some call, “a meat dog.”  One you can count on.  One that busts through thorny hedgerows without a whimper to retrieve a downed bird.  One that never gives up.  Meat dogs are good enough to bring home the bacon (upland game) but not a dog that the champion bloodline snob would ever consider.  He is relentless in pursuit and resilient.  He earns respect the hard way as an honest dog and a respectable Joe.

Rescues want to please and they are not picky.  They work twice as hard at earning their keep as any dog I’ve ever owned.   My eyes have been opened to believing in the breed and its natural abilities.  Much credit is given to those who preserve the breed standard through thoughtful, planned matings.  I’m not discouraging anyone from purchasing dogs from reputable breeders.  I am encouraging everyone to think twice–to look around and be open minded.

When you adopt a dog that is already here, you save two lives: 

his and the spot that just opened up

at a shelter or foster home for another dog in need.

I hope to one day be what we in the rescue business call “a foster failure.”  When the time is right, I will adopt my next GSP.  It won’t be a puppy because puppies are a lot of work and my husband and I are in our 50′s.  Somewhere out there is another middle aged “meat dog” we will be proud to call our own.  In the meantime, we will continue to foster, provide transports for dogs going to their furever homes, and donate old blankets and dog beds as we can.

If you have loved Harriet’s story, please consider donating what you can.  ANY amount is appreciated and 100% of the funds raised goes into dog rescue and care.  There are no administrative wages taken because we are purely volunteer based. Click on the link:  http://ilshorthairrescue.com/      ISR provides shelter, medical care and arrangements for dogs in Illinois, Indiana and Michigan.  They have a facebook page too, filled with adorable, adoptable dogs!

I thank you and Harriet thanks you!  Please join me in making it a Happy New Year for another homeless dog.

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