A Horse Called Music

!!alalala

It’s one of those melancholy moons tonight where memories bend and reflect.  The wine helps.

Earlier today I was listening to the 30th annual Farm Aid radio show, featuring Willie Nelson (and many other bands)  live from Chicago, my home sweet home.

His song, “A Horse Called Music” is so beautifully written that I get lost in it until the tears that trickle down bring me back to the here and now.  The song fillets my heart and lays it wide open…especially at the end.

Click the link and let the words and tender tune soak into your body.  My gift to you tonight.  Elevated cowboy art, featuring Merle Haggard.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_Hc8cEplSQ

“This dog don’t hunt.”

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He listened and a great sadness came. 

For ten years Zeke had given his all.  He burst through thickets and many times cut himself on brambles and thorns to reach downed birds for his god.  He took his job seriously.  There were times when the fur between his toes was covered in painful ice balls, and still he cut to the whistle, ran and retrieved.  Now, he was a little slower and a lot stiffer when coming out of the field. He was crippled up for a few days after a hunt, but always ready to go again.   The twinkle in his eye was hidden under a greying brow, but it was still there!  His 12 o’clock tail rocked furiously between 10 and 2 whenever he heard the word “birdies.”

Lately, though, he had been left behind.  Every. Time.

Heartbroken, he stood and stoically accepted his sentencing, “This dog don’t hunt.”  as his man handed him over to a shelter and drove away.  Zeke had played with the man’s children and watched them arrive one by one.  He will miss them.  He will miss the man, too.  As dogs do, he settled into homelessness.  People came everyday but no one looked past his grey face and egg beater gait.  They saw what was used up in him, not what was left to give.

On the last day the shelter could keep him, Zeke was rescued.  A woman arrived who had read Zeke’s story online.  She offered to foster him in her home, with her children and pets, until she found a Forever Home for him.  The shelter lovingly packed up his things (AKC Certificate, his vet records, leftover heart worm medication and a big tub of Vita-Pet Senior Glucosamine chews.)  He still wore a personalized collar with the name Zeke on it and a phone number that used to mean home.

His foster mother cleaned him up and took lots of adoption pictures of him to post on facebook (a site where Miracles can happen!)  Days passed and Zeke continued to soldier on. 

Then a woman 300 miles away read Zeke’s story and she wanted him.  She loved him in his old age and understood his young heart.  She, too, was a little stiff in the joints and grey.  She rescued a 12 year old girl, Dot, last year and wanted a companion for both of them to round out her family.  Her husband had passed away a few years ago and so she no longer made long drives by herself.  BUT SHE WANTED ZEKE.

Zeke needed a second miracle:  Transport.

People say that facebook isn’t real.  Well, it is real to Zeke and to me.  This writer read Zeke’s story and called his foster mother.  We women pulled together to make a second miracle for Zeke, the “Dog that don’t hunt.”   The pick up time was set for 11 a.m. in Muskegon, MI, two hours away from my start point.  When I met Zeke, I could see that he was a real gentleman.  His carriage was strong.  His eyes were warm and alert.  He held his head proudly.  He didn’t jump up or go wild.  He was a mature boy who had nice manners.  This was no throw-away dog!   Zeke called “shotgun” and we were off!

Dot and Zeke Meet

One cheeseburger (okay, two cheeseburgers) and four hours later, Zeke arrived up north, at his FOREVER HOME, near the beaches on Lake Huron.  His new Mom hugged him and he met Dot.   He rolled around, marked his favorite tree, and played fetch with Dot in their one acre fenced yard, which was filled with shady trees and a nice woodlot.  They became a family.  Today, the world is a better place because Zeke is home.  He is loved.  Zeke curls up in a new bed–where he chirps in his sleep while his four paws are up in the air, pumping and running.

Zeke is hunting birdies again.


 

Casseroles Need to Die

!!!!lalalalalalal

When compared to traditional dinners featuring a roasted meat, potato, and a vegetable, casseroles don’t stand a chance. Have you had a pork roast slathered in tuscan oil and topped with fresh herbs complimented by a roasted sweet potato and green beans baked with Lipton brown gravy and onion soup mix sprinkeld on top?  OMG

Invented at the same time as TV tray tables in the 70′s (another mistake) –casseroles have worn out their welcome.  They all involve cheese as a flavor cover-up and  feature five ingredients or less.  Kill me now.

Break out two chicken breasts on the George Foreman grill and sautee some mushrooms in butter on the stove top to pour over the them.  Done.  What could be easier?  Add Idahoan instant mashed potatoes and nuke a package of  frozen niblets corn.   Beat that Mr. Casserole.  The gauntlet is thrown.

The casserole is grossly over rated.

For the love of God, stop.

 

Let a Sleeping Dog Lie

Now when you are a dog, going to the Indiana Dunes means running wild on the endless beach and digging up fish bones until the cows come home.  You get to wade up to your pink belly in Lake Michigan, biting at the white caps and rollers.   It also means getting to run free on the wooded trails–trails that are full of poison ivy and adventure.   It’s all good when you are just a dog.

 

 Remi and I loved our time at the sand dunes. 

We visited a buffalo farm and dined on a gourmet dinner of tenderloin and buttered morels, expertly prepared!  My mom and I jumped in a sand hole because it was there and we could.  We were part of a small Airstream rally that weekend as we slurped up ice cream cones and buffalo stew.  We fed the mosquitoes at night and our campfire stories were interrupted by a ring-tailed intruder who scampered up a tree.  We stayed long enough to see a blaze orange sun-ball set against the downtown Chicago skyline.

The trip home was uneventful, which is the best kind of trip home when you are flying solo pulling a trailer.   We parked in the driveway and headed straight to bed.  Reunited, Remi snuggled up against daddy all night and he liked it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next morning, John woke up itching and erupting with poison ivy sores.  Did I mention that he is violently allergic to poison ivy?   HE naturally attributed the outbreak to his working on deer blinds and food plots the day before on Holly Road–where he is building a deer preserve.   That sounded good to me so I went with it. 

The lines of red scabby skin and puss sores cover his forearms and face.  He keeps wondering why it keeps coming out more and more.  I keep letting him wonder.

Could it be right where a little doggie, who missed her daddy, was curled up after a romp in the vine covered Indiana woods?  “Ruttt-Ro!”  At this point, I’m thinking it is best to let a sleeping dog LIE.

 

I Spy With My Little Eye

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I spy with my little eye new life stretching out in the glorious spring sun.  The fields on our farm are awake.  Dainty flowers, climbers and clovers, and buds — all ordinary, yet extraordinary.  Come take a walk with me!

 

 

Three Mile Island

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We were four brave souls who risked life and limb to participate in an expedition out to Turnip Rock, located three nautical miles from Port Austin, in Michigan’s thumb.  Our cast of characters included explorers from the states of Louisiana and Michigan.

Did I mention that there were titanic sheets of ice on the lake only 30 days ago?

None of us has any real expedition experience; it’s just that some of us have more brawn than brains.  This was risky business; disaster could strike at any moment:

  • One spill in the 40 degree waters of Lake Huron
  • Getting bombed by seagull poop
  • Getting caught in a riptide that dragged us out to sea
  • Breaking a nail
  • A tsunami could get us, after all, there really was an earthquake that day!

We threw our kayaks and canoes into a black covered trailer (a very covert operation) and made sure our last will and testaments were in good hands.  The trip was a three mile paddle out, three miles back, and it took three hours without “horsing around.”

Of course, we had to film the expedition!  Click on the orange link below to join us on this epic voyage.

Turnip Rock Expedition 2015

 

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